Blog Archive

Tor Dyke

Tor Dyke appears to have been attributed to Venutius which dates it of the period AD 52 – 70. The presence of a legionary size marching camp a few miles to the southwest at Malham certainly indicates an active role in the Roman advance of AD 70. However, given the lack of published research so far a clear picture has yet to emerge.

Thornborough Henges

A site that spans several thousands of years from the Stone Age to at least the Iron Age, the ancient people of the area built one of Britain’s largest ancient sites in Yorkshire, in what was to become the heart of Brigantia.

Rey Cross Roman Marching Camp

Rey Cross is one of the largest marching camps known in Britain, it is large enough to hold more thasn two legions (and therefore did) and has been dated to c. 71 A.D.

Pickhill Mound

A large artificial mound here, apparently raised for defensive purposes, bears the name of Picts’ Hill, and an improbable belief prevails that the Picts defeated the Romans in battle at a spot, not far off, called Roman Castle. This mound is also known as Money Hill, but, though partially cut away for the construction of the railway, the traditionary hidden treasure was not found

Near Moor

At SE48090 98917 this Neolithic Pointer lay’s close to a Bronze Age Field System. I have explored this area several times and find that much more time is needed as it is a vast area called Near Moor and was due in pre-history connected to Scratch Wood Moor to the north west.

Malham Roman Marching Camp

← North YorkshireSite Details: Around 70 AD Cerialis the new Governer of Britain ordered two of his legions advance on the Brigantes of Yorkshire. From the South west (North Wales?) came the XX legion commanded by Agricola. Their mission was to meet the IX legion at Stanwick to attack King Venutius. Was this legionary marching …

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Live Moor Hill Fort

“Whorlton, Live Moor, (NZ 496012) A previously unrecorded promontory fort was identified by D. Smith on air photographs and later surveyed by him and G. W. Goodall. A single rampart with external ditch extends across the west-facing spur of Live Moor to enclose an area of approximately 2 acres known as Knolls End.

Kirklington Tumulus

“Prehistoric vessels dug out of the mound at Stapely Hill, Kirklington, in 1903. Fragments of several pottery urns of the Bronze Age, C. 1,000 B.C., one containing cremated human bones” Description and photo’s from Kirklington Church.

Kilgram Bridge Ford

Kilgram bridge itself is of known ancient construction, and is believed to date from the early 12th century – probably built around 1145 AD by the Cistercian Monks who founded Jervaulx Abbey nearby. Local myth tells how the bridge was built by the Devil after a pact made with the local population. Kilgram Bridge is first mentioned in literature in 1301, however Kevin Cale, in his assessment of the bridge suggests an early 12th century date to be appropriate (4).

Hutton Moor Henge

Hutton Moor Henge is almost identical the the henges at Thornborough and Nunwick. It’s been proposed that these henges form part of a large scale ritual landscape created in the area, linked to the Rivers Ure and Warfe.

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