North Yorkshire

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Braithwaite Wood Fort, East Witton

Braithwaite Wood Fort, East Witton
We call Braithwaite Wood Fort Iron age but it's actually undated but it's typology indicates a potential Iron Age origin.

Maiden Castle Fort Reeth

Maiden Castle Fort Reeth
For over five hundred years, the miners and smelters of Reeth produced mountains of precious lead. The lead ores from Reeth had high concentrations of Silver, Lead itself became and important ingredient in bronze. Maiden Castle, deep in the Swaledale lead mining territory a unique piece of Iron Age architecture. It is the only known...

Stanwick Hill Fort

Stanwick Hill Fort
Stanwick is very close to the Scotch Corner junction of the A1, close to Darlington. From Scotch Corner, take the A66 towards Barnard Castle for a couple of miles then take the right turn towards Forcett. The road will take you past part of the defences, at which point a left turn will take you...

Scorton Cursus

Scorton Cursus
The cursus was originally about 2.1km long and aligned SE-NW. Clustered round the monument were a number of ring ditches, one that was excavated had a single burial with a beaker. This would date the site as being in use from around 3,500BC until at least the Bronze Age c.2,000 BC.

Roulston Scar Hill Fort

Roulston Scar Hill Fort
""We were shocked to discover such a huge complex," said Alastair Oswald, archaeological field investigator for English Heritage. Preliminary examinations of the remains suggest it was more than twice the size of most other prehistoric strongholds. Built of timber palisades and girdled by a 1.3 mile circuit of ramparts, 60 per cent of which are...

Staple Howe West Hesterton

This small farmstead was established on top of the small chalk hills on the northern edge of the Yorkshire Wolds.

Hutton Moor Henge

Hutton Moor Henge
Hutton Moor Henge is almost identical the the henges at Thornborough and Nunwick. It's been proposed that these henges form part of a large scale ritual landscape created in the area, linked to the Rivers Ure and Warfe.

Kilgram Bridge Ford

Kilgram Bridge Ford
Kilgram bridge itself is of known ancient construction, and is believed to date from the early 12th century - probably built around 1145 AD by the Cistercian Monks who founded Jervaulx Abbey nearby. Local myth tells how the bridge was built by the Devil after a pact made with the local population. Kilgram Bridge is...

Kirklington Tumulus

Kirklington Tumulus
"Prehistoric vessels dug out of the mound at Stapely Hill, Kirklington, in 1903. Fragments of several pottery urns of the Bronze Age, C. 1,000 B.C., one containing cremated human bones" Description and photo's from Kirklington Church.

Live Moor Hill Fort

Live Moor Hill Fort
"Whorlton, Live Moor, (NZ 496012) A previously unrecorded promontory fort was identified by D. Smith on air photographs and later surveyed by him and G. W. Goodall. A single rampart with external ditch extends across the west-facing spur of Live Moor to enclose an area of approximately 2 acres known as Knolls End.

Near Moor

Near Moor
At SE48090 98917 this Neolithic Pointer lay’s close to a Bronze Age Field System. I have explored this area several times and find that much more time is needed as it is a vast area called Near Moor and was due in pre-history connected to Scratch Wood Moor to the north west.

Pickhill Mound

Pickhill Mound
A large artificial mound here, apparently raised for defensive purposes, bears the name of Picts' Hill, and an improbable belief prevails that the Picts defeated the Romans in battle at a spot, not far off, called Roman Castle. This mound is also known as Money Hill, but, though partially cut away for the construction of...

Thornborough Henges

Thornborough Henges
A site that spans several thousands of years from the Stone Age to at least the Iron Age, the ancient people of the area built one of Britain's largest ancient sites in Yorkshire, in what was to become the heart of Brigantia.

Tor Dyke

Tor Dyke
Tor Dyke appears to have been attributed to Venutius which dates it of the period AD 52 - 70. The presence of a legionary size marching camp a few miles to the southwest at Malham certainly indicates an active role in the Roman advance of AD 70. However, given the lack of published research so...

Castle Dykes Roman Villa

Castle Dykes Roman Villa
This earthwork was partially excavated in 1870, these revealed the foundations for a Roman villa of obvious opulence. It's final Roman owners were believed to have suffered a grisly death as the villa burnt around them. It is likely that future excavations will reveal that the villa was built over of an earlier tribal centre....

Castle Steads Hill Fort

Castle Steads Hill Fort
Castle Steads is a Hill-Side Enclosure seemingly built without worry f threat from the upper slopes of the hill it is built on.

Catterick Henge

Analysis of air photography has revealed the almost complete plan of a feature. Thought to be a henge of similar nature to those elsewhere in the Swale-Ure valley. The bank of the earthwork was composed of river cobble and gravel dump construction. The cropmark remains appear to be the henge bank of some 140m in...

Catterick Roman Marching Camp

Catterick Roman Marching Camp
Discovered only recently by air survey and geophysics, this camp lies on the alluvial plain of the River Swale, on the south bank of the river just north east of Catterick racecourse. The camp lies some 350m to the west of Dere Street.

Catterick Roman Fort

Catterick Roman Fort
The Fort at Catterick. It has an unusual shape due to multiple fort plans being overlayed on it. Originally it was a Roman fort, but a settlement soon sprang up outside the fort, which soon dominated the fort, and Catterick became one of the most important 'Small towns' in the north of Britain.

Cleave Dyke Defensive System

Cleave Dyke Defensive System
The Cleave dyke system is several Dykes which combine to create a boundary of between 9 and 18 kilometres running north south to the west of Thirsk.

Devil’s Arrows

Devil’s Arrows
This Bronze Age site comprises of three large standing stones, it is thought originally there were as many as five stones in this alignment. Being Bronze Age little is known about the origin of the Devil's Arrows, the name reflecting a more recent myth. The monument is strongly linked with an alignment with several others...

Eboracum, York

Eboracum, York
Eboracum was the Roman capital of Northern England

St Michael’s Church Kirklington

St Michael’s Church Kirklington
St Michael's Church at Kirklington stems from prior to the Norman Period and has ghosts of an even earlier period in the form of the various carved heads found inside and outside the church.

St John the Baptist Church Stanwick

St John the Baptist Church Stanwick
The church at Stanwick sits very close to the original centre of the Iron Age fort. It's churchyard seems to respect a more ancient ritual use and it's siting in conjunction with not only Mary Wild Beck but also the Sacred Spring in at the front of this church and it's 10th century origins indicate...

St Cuthberts Church Forcett

St Cuthberts Church Forcett
Whilst the current church lacks much in the way of indications of ancient origins, it's entry porch boasts a wealth of 12c carved stones and is definitely worth a visit.

Rudston Standing Stone

Rudston Standing Stone
Rudston is England's tallest Standing Stone and it's presence gave the name to the village that it's located in. It's presumed to be of Neolithic origin. It's just over 25ft high.

All Saints Church Rudston

All Saints Church Rudston
All Saints Church in Rudston sits in the grounds of the famous Rudston Standing Stone, this alone clearly points to the area being of ritual use thousands of years before this Norman church was erected.

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