Category: Roman

Housesteads Roman Fort

Carved Heads from Housesteads Roman Fort

Eboracum, York

Eboracum was the Roman capital of Northern England

Catterick Roman Fort

The Fort at Catterick. It has an unusual shape due to multiple fort plans being overlayed on it. Originally it was a Roman fort, but a settlement soon sprang up outside the fort, which soon dominated the fort, and Catterick became one of the most important ‘Small towns’ in the north of Britain.

Catterick Roman Marching Camp

Discovered only recently by air survey and geophysics, this camp lies on the alluvial plain of the River Swale, on the south bank of the river just north east of Catterick racecourse. The camp lies some 350m to the west of Dere Street.

Castle Dykes Roman Villa

This earthwork was partially excavated in 1870, these revealed the foundations for a Roman villa of obvious opulence. It’s final Roman owners were believed to have suffered a grisly death as the villa burnt around them. It is likely that future excavations will reveal that the villa was built over of an earlier tribal canter. Probably replacing the shrine to the “Light Water” with a more Mediterranean alternative.

Troutback Roman Camps

At Troutbeck are three Roman marching camps and a small fort. This could be either a training camp or signs of three campaigns and a later fort.

Rey Cross Roman Marching Camp

Rey Cross is one of the largest marching camps known in Britain, it is large enough to hold more thasn two legions (and therefore did) and has been dated to c. 71 A.D.

Malham Roman Marching Camp

Period: Roman Location: north-yorkshire Type: Roman Marching Camp ← North YorkshireSite Details: Around 70 AD Cerialis the new Governer of Britain ordered two of his legions advance on the Brigantes of Yorkshire. From the South west (North Wales?) came the XX legion commanded by Agricola. Their mission was to meet the IX legion at Stanwick …

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Kilgram Bridge Ford

Kilgram bridge itself is of known ancient construction, and is believed to date from the early 12th century – probably built around 1145 AD by the Cistercian Monks who founded Jervaulx Abbey nearby. Local myth tells how the bridge was built by the Devil after a pact made with the local population. Kilgram Bridge is first mentioned in literature in 1301, however Kevin Cale, in his assessment of the bridge suggests an early 12th century date to be appropriate (4).

Fremington Hagg

Period: Roman Location: north-yorkshire Type: Roman Military Activity ← North YorkshireSite Details:Fremington Hagg Roman Cavalry Hoard The Fremington hoard was found sometime prior to 1833 and the objects were presented to the Yorkshire museum, further items however, were later presented to the British Museum in 1880 and there has be conjecture as to if both …

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