Category: Early Christian

Early Christian syncretism and how the old ones hid amongst the new religion

Syncretism is where two or more differing beliefs become merged. In England, this first happened under Roman rule, where many pre-existing Celtic shrines to specific deities were associated with Roman deities of the same qualities or attributes. Based on extensive research, I am now confident that in Britain, the early Christians undertook a similar process and with that knowledge, we should be able to reverse engineer, to some extent, our local Brigantian Celtic pantheons.

Syncretism through the ages

Syncretism, the amalgamation of different religions, cultures, or schools of thought, has its roots in the ancient world.

Egglestone Abbey, Barnard Castle

Egglestone Abbey, nestled on the southern bank of the River Tees, is a testament to the spiritual and architectural endeavours of the Premonstratensian canons. Founded between 1195 and 1198 by the de Moulton family, the abbey was established during a period of monastic expansion in England.

The Premonstratensians

The Premonstratensians, emerging in the early 12th century, represent a unique blend of monastic traditions and clerical duties. Founded by St. Norbert of Xanten in Prémontré, France, this order of canons regular adopted the Rule of St. Augustine but infused it with the rigorous asceticism reminiscent of the Cistercian way of life.

St Michael and All Angels Church, Hubberholme

St Michael & All Angels Church, nestled in the serene setting of Hubberholme in North Yorkshire, is a historical gem dating back to the 12th century.

Pope Gregory the Great

Pope Gregory the Great, born around 540 AD as Gregorius Anicius in Rome, was a pivotal figure in the early medieval church, ascending to the papacy in 590 AD

Archbishop Lanfranc

Archbishop Lanfranc was a prominent figure in the 11th century, renowned for his role as a scholar, teacher, and ecclesiastical statesman.

The growth of Christianity 50AD – 1100AD

We look at the development of Christianity from 50AD to 1100AD in both the broader European context and also for the people of Brigantia.

James the Deacon of York

The Gregorian mission, characterized by its strategic and persistent efforts, was bolstered in 601AD with the arrival of Paulinus, one of the monks sent by Pope Gregory to support Augustine’s endeavours. Among those accompanying Paulinus was James the Deacon, a figure shrouded in mystery due to the scant historical records of his life.

Agricultural practices through time

Prehistoric Yorkshire is a landscape rich with history, revealed through various archaeological finds that offer a glimpse into the ancient past. The oldest evidence of human activity in this region dates back to around 125,000 years ago, but it is the later periods, particularly the Iron Age, that have yielded significant discoveries related to ploughing and farming.

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