Period: Iron Age

Syncretism through the ages

Syncretism, the amalgamation of different religions, cultures, or schools of thought, has its roots in the ancient world.

Boadicea

Boadicea, also known as Boudica, was a queen of the Iceni tribe, a Celtic tribe that lived in what is now Eastern England.

Mitchell Laithes Farm Ring Cairn and burial complex, Ossett, West Yorkshire

The Bronze Age discoveries in Mitchell Laithes Farm, Ossett, West Yorkshire, offer an important glimpse into the region’s ancient past. Archaeological appraisals, particularly the one conducted in 2007 at Mitchell Laithes Rye Royds, have unearthed evidence of short episodes of occupation dating back to 3500-2000 BC.

Bowbridge Lane Late Bronze Age burial site, Catterick

The excavation on the northern side of Bowbridge Lane as part of the A1 expansion revealed a significant archaeological site, with features indicative of Late Bronze Age funerary practices.

Iceni

The Iceni tribe, known in Latin as Icēnī, was a powerful and significant group during the Iron Age and early Roman era in what is now eastern Britain.

Agricultural practices through time

Prehistoric Yorkshire is a landscape rich with history, revealed through various archaeological finds that offer a glimpse into the ancient past. The oldest evidence of human activity in this region dates back to around 125,000 years ago, but it is the later periods, particularly the Iron Age, that have yielded significant discoveries related to ploughing and farming.

Scotts Dyke – Richmond

Scott’s Dyke, also known as Scots Dyke or Scots Dike, is a significant linear earthwork stretching approximately fourteen kilometres from the River Swale to the River Tees, this ancient structure is believed to date back to the period between the first century BC and the first century AD.

Venutius

Venutius was a notable figure in the 1st-century history of northern Britain, known primarily as the king of the Brigantes during the Roman conquest. The following text summarises what we can potentially understand about him, and tries to tie him to places and other possibilities that are not supported by the historical record. At the end of the section, what records to exist are explained.

Hall Tower Hill and Wendel Hill – Barwick in Elmet

The massive earthworks at Barwick and the continuation of the same profile alongside the River Cock to Aberford and beyond point to it being a place of importance as a large hillfort of some 15 acres. There were several hillforts in northern Britain when it was inhabited by a Celtic tribe called the Brigantes.

Earthworks at the top of Holly Hill, Well

While details about these earthworks are not widely documented, the area is known for its rich archaeological significance. Holly Hill itself is a place of interest, with its Grade II listed status indicating its historical importance.

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