Category: Neolithic

Newton Kyme Henge

With kind permission of YAAMAPPING

Newton Kyme hosts the site for what was once a 200m henge of the Thornborough variety.

Sinderby Henge

With kind permission of YAAMAPPING

Although all the existing literature assures us that the Great Henge Alignments of North Yorkshire are now covered by – The Langthorpe Earthwork, Cana Barn Henge, Nunwick Henge and Hutton Moor, finishing with the astounding triple Henge alignment at Thornborough, this may not necessarily be the case.

Castle Dykes Henge, Thoralby – North Yorkshire

With kind permission of YAAMAPPING

Castle dykes it is a small class one henge, only 90m across, perched on the high ground up in the North Yorkshire dales.

Maidens Grave – Burton Fleming, North Yorkshire

With kind permission of YAAMAPPING

A henge located north of Rudston,The henge was discovered as a cropmark on an aerial photograph in the early 1960s, although subsequent field investigation showed it to survive as an earthwork, albeit badly plough-damaged.

Nunwick Henge

With kind permission of YAAMAPPING

A henge at Nunwick visible both as a low bank and shallow internal ditch and as a cropmark. A berm was originally present between ditch and bank.

Rudston Standing Stone

Rudston is England’s tallest Standing Stone and it’s presence gave the name to the village that it’s located in. It’s presumed to be of Neolithic origin. It’s just over 25ft high.

Catterick Henge

Analysis of air photography has revealed the almost complete plan of a feature. Thought to be a henge of similar nature to those elsewhere in the Swale-Ure valley. The bank of the earthwork was composed of river cobble and gravel dump construction. The cropmark remains appear to be the henge bank of some 140m in diameter.

Thornborough Henges

A site that spans several thousands of years from the Stone Age to at least the Iron Age, the ancient people of the area built one of Britain’s largest ancient sites in Yorkshire, in what was to become the heart of Brigantia.

Hutton Moor Henge

Hutton Moor Henge is almost identical the the henges at Thornborough and Nunwick. It’s been proposed that these henges form part of a large scale ritual landscape created in the area, linked to the Rivers Ure and Warfe.

Scorton Cursus

The cursus was originally about 2.1km long and aligned SE-NW. Clustered round the monument were a number of ring ditches, one that was excavated had a single burial with a beaker. This would date the site as being in use from around 3,500BC until at least the Bronze Age c.2,000 BC.

Skip to toolbar