Location: north-yorkshire

Kirklington Tumulus

“Prehistoric vessels dug out of the mound at Stapely Hill, Kirklington, in 1903. Fragments of several pottery urns of the Bronze Age, C. 1,000 B.C., one containing cremated human bones” Description and photo’s from Kirklington Church.

Kilgram Bridge Ford

Kilgram bridge itself is of known ancient construction, and is believed to date from the early 12th century – probably built around 1145 AD by the Cistercian Monks who founded Jervaulx Abbey nearby. Local myth tells how the bridge was built by the Devil after a pact made with the local population. Kilgram Bridge is first mentioned in literature in 1301, however Kevin Cale, in his assessment of the bridge suggests an early 12th century date to be appropriate (4).

Hutton Moor Henge

Hutton Moor Henge is almost identical the the henges at Thornborough and Nunwick. It’s been proposed that these henges form part of a large scale ritual landscape created in the area, linked to the Rivers Ure and Warfe.

Fremington Hagg

← North YorkshireSite Details:Fremington Hagg Roman Cavalry Hoard The Fremington hoard was found sometime prior to 1833 and the objects were presented to the Yorkshire museum, further items however, were later presented to the British Museum in 1880 and there has be conjecture as to if both collections were from the same, or different hoards. …

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Staple Howe West Hesterton

This small farmstead was established on top of the small chalk hills on the northern edge of the Yorkshire Wolds.

Roulston Scar Hill Fort

“”We were shocked to discover such a huge complex,” said Alastair Oswald, archaeological field investigator for English Heritage. Preliminary examinations of the remains suggest it was more than twice the size of most other prehistoric strongholds. Built of timber palisades and girdled by a 1.3 mile circuit of ramparts, 60 per cent of which are cut out of solid limestone, the fort has been provisionally dated at 400BC.

Scorton Cursus

The cursus was originally about 2.1km long and aligned SE-NW. Clustered round the monument were a number of ring ditches, one that was excavated had a single burial with a beaker. This would date the site as being in use from around 3,500BC until at least the Bronze Age c.2,000 BC.

Stanwick Hill Fort

Stanwick is very close to the Scotch Corner junction of the A1, close to Darlington. From Scotch Corner, take the A66 towards Barnard Castle for a couple of miles then take the right turn towards Forcett. The road will take you past part of the defences, at which point a left turn will take you to Stanwick St John Church, which is a suitable starting point for any visit.

Maiden Castle Fort Reeth

For over five hundred years, the miners and smelters of Reeth produced mountains of precious lead. The lead ores from Reeth had high concentrations of Silver, Lead itself became and important ingredient in bronze. Maiden Castle, deep in the Swaledale lead mining territory a unique piece of Iron Age architecture. It is the only known fort with what seems to be a processional entrance.

Braithwaite Wood Fort, East Witton

We call Braithwaite Wood Fort Iron age but it’s actually undated but it’s typology indicates a potential Iron Age origin.

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